Archive for July, 2008

One of my fellow Knight fellows Andrew has also started a blog to chronicle his thoughts during our time at Stanford. His first post is insightful and eloquent about the challenges facing the media. He also talks about why journalists have lost credibility with the public as the Internet lays bare the superficiality of what […]


The Huffingon Post has a new feature where they claim to report news “the mainstream media forgot to report.” The only problem is that their links mostly point to mainstream media reporting exactly these stories. The news is out there, it’s really not that hard to find as is proven by these not-so-dedicated diggers at […]


The Economist highlights the fact that while the dismal news about U.S. newspapers seems unending, the story isn’t the same elsewhere around the world. Newspapers are flourishing in developing countries, boosted by rising literacy and prosperity. As people become more prosperous, they care more about what’s happening around them: The demand for news tends to […]


Nicholas Kristof mentions a new Web site that aims to do “citizen foreign correspondence.” It’s called Demotix and it proclaims itself to be the “citizen wire.” So I took a look. The site says it was founded because only four U.S. newspapers have foreign desks, which I suppose indicates that they have actual foreign correspondents […]


Local TV news in the U.S. has long been mostly devoid of real journalism. Sensationalized crime reports and gotcha stories about supposed health scandals are designed to scare people into watching, rather than impart any useful information. It really is about entertainment, a sort of blander reality show minus the guilty pleasure and weekly eliminations. […]


Will there be iPhone 3Gs (or is it iPhones 3G?) in stock by the time I return to the U.S. in September? Thankfully, it seems northern California is relatively well-supplied with the holy gadget. It pays to be close to One Infinite Loop.


The New York Times writes about a network of citizen journalists reporting on the U.S. presidential campaign. While newspapers are slashing staffs, the outfit linked to the Huffington Post called Off the Bus claims to have amassed an army of 7,500 reporters — far more than any traditional American news organization today. For example, The […]